Excerpt #2

Not too long after the first…

Aedh Muimhnech Ó Conchobair watched his new wife carefully as she shifted, very unladylike, on a couch across from him. He wasn’t sure what to think of this new addition to his household. She did not seem to know her place. She was peculiar, to say the least – entirely unorthodox. She was bolder than any woman he’d ever met and she was as stubborn as a bad mare.

“Would you sit still, Alexandra?” he asked, annoyed. She looked up at him with her beautiful blue eyes. They were the colour of the sea at Gaillimh, he noticed. And perfectly set off by the rich auburn hair that fell in loose curls around her shoulders. He caught himself admiring her. She certainly wasn’t what he feared he might be saddled with when he agreed to the marriage. Her form was as pleasing as her face, with subtle curves and hips that could easily bear his children. He had seen her naked through the water in her bath that morning, and he could not seem to shake the image on her wet, soft skin from his mind.

“Would you tell me why I lied to a priest for you?” she demanded, breaking his train of thought.
“It is simple,” Aedh spoke to her as if she was a child, “Father James has long been under the employ of your cousin, and in order for the alliance to be secured, our marriage must be…”
“Consummated?” Lexi interrupted.
“Yes.” Aedh replied. Lexi didn’t know what to think about that. Did he not want to consummate their marriage? More importantly, why did she care? She didn’t want some strange man, even one that was 6 feet of hot Irish man, forcing himself on her and calling it her wifely duty. But for some reason, she was annoyed at what she was sure was his lack of desire to bed her.
“So rather than suffer through that, we lie,” Lexi said.
“Exactly,” Aedh look relieved that she understood. Lexi glared at him and his ability to make her feel completely undesirable.

12 Comments

  • By Shaun Mcalister, December 3, 2010 @ 9:49 am

    “6 feet of hot Irish man” - best written line ever!

  • By Hezabelle, December 3, 2010 @ 10:30 am

    I thought so :) hahaha

  • By Sebastian, December 5, 2010 @ 11:19 am

    Aw, I was going to comment on it… but Shaun beat me to it :)

    You know Aedh, pronounced, is a bit of an odd name? :P But having said that, the rest of his name is pretty crazy too…

  • By Hezabelle, December 5, 2010 @ 1:46 pm

    Apparently, according to name websites I’ve read, Aedh is the early Irish version of Hugh. That being said, it’s pronounced “Ay-ed” so…. I’m not sure how that works. Aedh Muimhnech Ó Conchobair is actually a real person! It’s on Wikipedia and everything! The Ó Conchobair (O’Conor’s) were the kings of Connacht for a long time. And Muimhnech means he was fostered in Munster. Irish names are fun!

  • By Sebastian, December 5, 2010 @ 1:53 pm

    I thought ‘dh’ was one of the Gallic consonants? Like ‘bh’ (and a lot of other *h combos).

  • By Hezabelle, December 5, 2010 @ 6:28 pm

    So it turns out it actually more rhymes with “day.”

    http://www.forvo.com/word/aedh/

    I can’t remember where I saw “ay-ed” but I should send them an angry email.

  • By Sebastian, December 5, 2010 @ 6:35 pm

    Yeah, that’s what I was getting at :) It would be something like ‘Aey’… which is very pretty, but lacks a bit of GRAVITAS for a leading man.

    (I think it could also be pronounced almost like our spoken letter H — aitch…)

  • By Hezabelle, December 5, 2010 @ 6:41 pm

    haha Well, the name seems to fit him. It.. gets to the point? Either way, I wanted to use a real historical person in an effort to make it as accurate a historical romance as possible. :)

  • By Sebastian, December 5, 2010 @ 6:43 pm

    Ya! It’s good! Get to the juicy bits already!

  • By Hezabelle, December 5, 2010 @ 6:44 pm

    …Those aren’t for internet publication. hahaha

  • By Sebastian, December 5, 2010 @ 6:49 pm

    But, but… I require titillation :(

  • By Eleni, December 7, 2010 @ 8:41 pm

    Hahaha, this is great :)

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